What Is A Stipple Portrait?

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Stipple Portrait

Stipple Portrait - A Close Up Of Pope John Paul II


Stipple

stip·ple  (stpl)tr.v. stip·pled, stip·pling, stip·ples1. To draw, engrave, or paint in dots or short strokes.2. To apply (paint, for example) in dots or short strokes.3. To dot, fleck, or speckle: “They crossed a field stippled with purple weeds” (Flannery O’Connor).n.1. A method of drawing, engraving, or painting using dots or short strokes.

The making of a pattern simulating different degrees of solidity or shading by using small dots. Such a pattern may occur in nature and it is frequently emulated by artists such as Todd Claydon.

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In a stippled drawing or painting, the dots are made of a single colour and applied with a pen or brush; the denser the dots, the darker the apparent shade—or lighter, if the ink is lighter than the surface. This is different from pointillism. It uses dots of many colours to simulate blended colours. In printmaking, dots may be etched out of a surface to which ink will be applied, to produce either more or less density of ink depending on the technique. In engraving, this style was invented by Giulio Campagnola in around 1510. This technique is also used in engraving or sculpting an object even when there is no ink or paint involved, either to change the texture of the object, or to produce the appearance of light or dark shading depending on the reflective properties of the surface: for example, engraving dots on glass produces areas that appear brighter than the surrounding glass.

This became popular as a means of producing shaded line art illustrations for publication. Drawings created this way could be reproduced in simple black ink. The other common method is hatching (cross-hatching), which uses lines instead of dots. Stipple has traditionally been favoured over hatching in biological and medical illustration. It is less likely than hatching to interfere visually with the structures being illustrated (the lines used in hatching can be mistaken for actual contours). Also since it allows the artist to vary the density of shading more subtly to depict curved or irregular surfaces.


“Stipple Portrait”

stipple portrait

Stipple Art – A close up view of the stipple art of Todd Claydon.

The work of Todd Claydon viewed above and below to serve as an example of shading technique & definition. When viewed closely you can observe the differing patterns of dot creating shade and contrast throughout this portrait. This particular portrait was 5 months of full time work in the making. No mistakes can be made and attention is given to each and every hand applied dot to form this image.

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Looking at the detail you can see how just a very few misplaced dots could easily create a shadow or mark that does not belong. This particular styling is done with a .25mm tech pen using black ink on an illustration board.



“Stipple Portrait – Nikki Sixx”

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Stipple Portrait – Nikki Sixx

In this portrait of Nikki Sixx, stipple was used to show hair and “shadows” from hair on shaded skin. Very complex and very, very difficult to do. This scale when doing portraits demands a great deal of patience and time to complete. Compounded with that is knowing when to stop before your shading begins to form a pattern of its own.


LED ZEPPELIN, SAINT JOHN PAUL II, MOTLEY CRUE, PIERRE TRUDEAU, VINCE NEIL, TOMMY LEE, BILL CLINTON, NIKKI SIXX… ALL IN STIPPLE FORM

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